Contributors

Listed by last name.

A (1) | B (1) | D (4) | E (1) | G (1) | H (5) | K (2) | L (1) | M (1) | P (1) | R (1) | S (4) | W (2) | Y (1)
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
The University of Memphis
Luvell Anderson specializes in the philosophy of language and philosophy of race and has published articles on racial slurs. His work concentrates on the semantics and ethics of racial language and racist humor and the normativity of offense. Luvell also has interests in social and political philosophy and the philosophy of mind.
Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Alex Byrne is chair of the philosophy section. He did his graduate work at Princeton before arriving at MIT in 1994 via a postdoc at Caltech. His main interests are philosophy of mind (especially perception and consciousness), epistemology (especially self-knowledge), and metaphysics (especially color). He also dabbles in other areas, including philosophy of language, metaethics, and Wittgenstein.
Andrew Downey Orrick Professor / 
Philosophy
Yale University
Stephen Darwall teaches at the Department of Philosophy at Yale University.  Previously, he taught for twenty-four years at the University of Michigan and, before that for twelve at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His primary interests are in metaethics and normative ethics.                           
Andrew Downey Orrick Professor of Philosophy / 
Philosophy
Yale University
Michael Della Rocca teaches at the Department of Philosophy at Yale University. His primary interests are in early modern (17th and 18th century) philosophy, especially the rationalist philosophers Spinoza. Michael also has a significant (non-philosophical) interest in the Mets.         
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
The University of Vermont
Tyler Doggett is most interested in ethics, philosophy of mind, early modern philosophy and metaphysics.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Stanford University
Tom grew up in Sevenoaks, Kent. As an undergraduate, he studied mathematics and philosophy at Oxford University. He's currently an Assistant Professor at Stanford University, previously serving as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. He works on pragmatism, the philosophy of mathematics and logic, and metaphysics. He's also working on an introductory philosophy textbook, with Stephen Stich. When he's not doing philosophy, he's often on a bike or eating pancakes.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Saint Mary's University
Scott teaches philosophy at Saint Mary's University. His primary interests are in the history of philosophy (particularly Kant).
Senior Fellow / 
Philosophy
Rivendell Institute at Yale University
Greg Ganssle has been thinking about the intersection of Christian faith and contemporary scholarship for over thirty years. After graduating from the University of Maryland in 1978, he worked in campus ministry on a variety of campuses. Hundreds of conversations with students from a wide variety of religious and philosophical perspectives drove him to a sustained self-study program. Eventually it occurred to him that he was reading philosophy.  Within weeks, he was hooked. Greg has been married to Jeanie since 1985. They have three children, none of whom are philosophers. Although happily married, Greg has a secret crush on Jane Austen.             
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Caspar Hare is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at MIT.  He writes about ethics, practical rationality, metaphysics, and the connections between them. He knows a magic trick that Winston Churchill once insisted be performed half a dozen times (he was still baffled).
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Matthew C. Harris is a Philosophy PhD student at Duke University. His interests include philosophical psychology, personal identity and pragmatism.
Ford Professor of Philosophy and Women's & Gender Studies / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sally Haslanger is a Professor of Philosophy at MIT, and the Director of the MIT Women’s and Gender Studies program. Her philosophical interests are broad. She began her life in philosophy interested in metaphysics, epistemology and ancient philosophy; over time she has developed her interests in social and political philosophy and feminist theory. She has an adorable dog named ‘Sparky’.                       
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Paul Henne is a PhD student at Duke University. Before attending Duke, he received his MA from Arizona State University and his BA from Lake Forest College. His primary interests in philosophy are in metaphysics and empirical philosophy, and they are particularly about absences, omissions, and nothingness. He is, for instance, curious about the gap between our judgments about omissions and their relation to the world.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Cambridge
Richard Holton is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Camrbdige (previously at MIT). His dissertation was on philosophy of language, and he continues to work in that area, but he currently works mainly in moral psychology, ethics, and philosophy of law. If you need your bike fixed, Richard’s your man.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Justin is an assistant professor of philosophy at MIT. He did his graduate work in philosophy at Yale, after receiving my BA from UC-Davis. His research is focused primarily within philosophy of language and related issues in metaphysics.
Professor / 
Philosophy and Cognitive Science
Yale University
Joshua Knobe is an experimental philosopher, appointed in both the Program in Cognitive Science and the Department of Philosophy. Most of his work involves using the kinds of experimental methods associated with cognitive science to address the kinds of questions associated with philosophy.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Barnard-Columbia University
Karen Lewis teaches philosophy at Barnard-Columbia.  Previously, she was an assistant professor in the school of philosophy at USC. Her research is mainly in the philosophy of language, though it often brings me into the realms of metaphysics, epistemology, cognitive science, philosophy of mind, and linguistics.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Julia Markovits teaches philosophy at MIT. Before joining the MIT philosophy faculty as an assistant professor in 2009, shet spent three years as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Her research focuses on ethics.  More specifically, on questions concerning the nature of moral reasons and about moral praiseworthiness and blameworthiness.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Northern Illinois University
Geoff Pynn (PhD, Yale University) specializes in epistemology and philosophy of language, in particular on issues concerning the nature, function, and norms of assertion, and the semantics and pragmatics of epistemic terms like "know".  He also regularly teaches logic and early modern philosophy.  
Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Agustin Rayo is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at MIT. He works in the intersection of philosophy of logic and philosophy of language. The largest finite number ever named by a human being was named by Agustin on January 26, 2007. It is really big.
Assistant Professor / 
Linguistics
University of Minnesota Duluth
William Salmon is an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Minnesota Duluth. His research and teaching interests are primarily in semantics, pragmatics, and sociolinguistic variation in dialects of English as well as Belizean Kriol.  Will did his PhD in linguistics at Yale University working with Larry Horn.  His last name, Salmon, appears in the Old Testament, in the book of Joshua, in the story of the battle of Jericho. Salmon was a spy in this battle, and he was given shelter by a harlot named Rahab, whom he later married. The name also appears in the New Testament, in the book of Matthew, in the long lineage of begats stretching from Abraham to Jesus.

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