Contributors

Listed by last name.

A (3) | B (2) | C (3) | D (7) | E (2) | F (2) | G (6) | H (6) | J (2) | K (4) | L (2) | M (4) | N (3) | O (1) | P (1) | R (4) | S (9) | T (2) | W (5) | Y (1)
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
University of New Orleans
Chris W. Surprenant received his B.A. from Colby College and his Ph.D. from Boston University. His areas of specialization are History of Philosophy (Ancient and Early Modern, especially Kant), Moral Philosophy, and Political Philosophy.
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
University of California, Los Angeles
Femi is currently pursuing his PhD in philosophy at UCLA, concentrating on metaethics, political philosophy and philosophy of law.  He also performs as a rapper.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Seton Hall University
Professor Timmerman's main research interests are in ethics, death, and epistemology. He primarily focuses on the actualism/possibilism debate in normative ethics, deprivationism and axiological questions in the death literature, and global poverty and animal welfare in applied ethics. In epistemology, he has worked on the lottery paradox and peer disagreement. Recent publications on death include Your Death Might Be the Worst Thing Ever to Happen to You (But Maybe You Shouldn't Care) in the Canadian Journal of Philosophy (2016) and Reconsidering Categorical Desire Views in Rowman & Littlefield's Immortality and the Philosophy of Death (2016). Recent publications on global poverty include Sometimes There is Nothing Wrong with Letting a Child Drown in Analysis(2015) and a review of Peter Singer's The Most Good You Can Do (2016) in the Philosophical Quarterly. Recent publications on the actualism/possibilism...
Assistant Professor / 
Professor of Humanities
Yale-NUS College
Dr. Walker received his PhD in Philosophy from Yale University (2008). Dr. Walker specializes in ancient Greek philosophy and ethical theory, especially Aristotle and virtue ethics. He is currently at work on a book examining Aristotle’s views on happiness against the background of Aristotle’s natural philosophy.
Lecturer / 
Philosophy
Stanford University
Jennifer Wang is a lecturer at Stanford University (previously she was an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Georgia).  She earned her PhD at Rutgers University where she worked with Dean Zimmerman.  Her dissertation research is in the metaphysics of modality, although she is also interested in logic, epistemology, and early modern philosophy. Jenn once dressed up as the Ship of Theseus for Halloween.  It's debatable if she survived the night.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Toronto
Jonathan Weisberg is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto and a managing editor for Ergo.  His research interests include epistemology and decision theory.
Professor / 
Philosophy
Duke University
David Wong (Ph.D. Princeton, 1977) is the Susan Fox Beischer and George D. Beischer Professor of Philosophy. Before he came to Duke, he was the Harry Austryn Wolfson Professor of Philosophy at Brandeis University and the John M. Findlay Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Boston University. His works include Moral Relativity (University of California Press, 1984) and Natural Moralities (Oxford University Press, 2006), and articles and chapters on ethical theory, moral psychology and early Chinese philosophy. He was interviewed on the subjects of cultural and moral relativism for the Public Television Series, "The Examined Life." He is co-editor with Kwong-loi Shun of an anthology of comparative essays on Confucianism and Western philosophy:Confucian Ethics: a Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy and Community (Cambridge University Press, 2004). The main subjects of his research include 1) the nature and extent of moral differences and similarities across and...
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
University of Cambridge
I'm a graduate student in history and philosophy of science at the University of Cambridge. I received my BA in philosophy from Duke University in 2015. I work primarily on the philosophy of biology and bioethics. I also have interests in the history of medicine and cancer evolution.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Mississippi
Timothy Yenter is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Mississippi. He earned his PhD from Yale University.  His dissertation examined demonstrative arguments in David Hume. Tim also occasionally reads and writes about film, television, sports, and music.

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