Contributors

Listed by last name.

A (3) | B (2) | C (3) | D (7) | E (2) | F (2) | G (6) | H (6) | J (2) | K (4) | L (2) | M (4) | N (3) | O (1) | P (1) | R (4) | S (9) | T (2) | W (5) | Y (1)
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Cornell University
Julia Markovits teaches philosophy at Cornell. Before joining Cornell, she taught at MIT and was as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Her research focuses on ethics.  More specifically, on questions concerning the nature of moral reasons and about moral praiseworthiness and blameworthiness.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Alabama at Birmingham
I am Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. My research primarily focuses on issues in contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science. I'm particularly interested in explanatory reasoning and its role in responding to skeptical challenges as well as generating scientific and everyday knowledge.
Professor / 
Philosophy
Pennsylvania State University
Eduardo Mendieta is professor of philosophy at Pennsylvania State University. Professor Mendieta works on critical philosophy of race, Latin American philosophy, the Frankfurt School, and issues relating to religion, globalization, global justice, and animality.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Toronto
Jennifer Nagel is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto.  Her research interests include epistemology and metacognition.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Ram Neta specializes in epistemology and is currently at work on a book on the nature of knowledge. In particular, he is trying to understand what knowledge is by examining the various ways in which knowing some things depends upon knowing other things. He regularly teaches seminars in epistemology, occasionally teaches seminars in the philosophy of mind or the history of analytic philosophy, and also regularly teaches introductory courses in philosophy. Together with Walter Sinnott-Armstrong of Duke University, he teaches a Coursera course on reasoning to hundreds of thousands of students.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Arizona
My research focuses on the psychological underpinnings of ordinary thinking about philosophical issues. Recently, I've been applying this method to issues surrounding free will, the self, consciousness, and causation.
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
City University of New York
Ian Olasov is a graduate student in philosophy at the CUNY Graduate Center and the organizer of Brooklyn Public Philosophers. His current research is on how people talk about morality. He's also interested in the philosophy of language, experimental philosophy, and how to make philosophy matter to more people.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Northern Illinois University
Geoff Pynn (PhD, Yale University) specializes in epistemology and philosophy of language, in particular on issues concerning the nature, function, and norms of assertion, and the semantics and pragmatics of epistemic terms like "know".  He also regularly teaches logic and early modern philosophy.  
Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Agustin Rayo is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at MIT. He works in the intersection of philosophy of logic and philosophy of language. The largest finite number ever named by a human being was named by Agustin on January 26, 2007. It is really big.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Harvard University
My research concerns what we should believe—in science, philosophy, and everyday life—and how probability can be used to model rational belief.  Specific topics include skepticism, the ethics of belief, imprecise probability and decision theory, the ravens paradox, and philosophical methodology.  My teaching interests are broad, including logic, happiness and Asian philosophy.  I received a BA from Stanford and a PhD from MIT.  Currently I am an Assistant Professor at Harvard.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
City College of New York
Katherine Ritchie is an assistant professor of philosophy at the City College of New York. She received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin in 2013 and her B.A. from Lewis and Clark College. Before joining CCNY she taught at Duke University.  Her research focuses on issues in metaphysics, social ontology and the philosophy of language. Katherine has presented at international conferences in 6 countries. Her work has been published in the journal Philosophical Studies. She is currently working on a book chapter and additional articles. 
Lecturer / 
Philosophy
University of Oxford
Richard Rowland is a Departmental Lecturer in Philosophy at Somerville College, University of Oxford. His work deals with the relationship between reasons and value, the moral error theory, and epistemic normativity.
Assistant Professor / 
Linguistics
University of Minnesota Duluth
William Salmon is an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Minnesota Duluth. His research and teaching interests are primarily in semantics, pragmatics, and sociolinguistic variation in dialects of English as well as Belizean Kriol.  Will did his PhD in linguistics at Yale University working with Larry Horn.  His last name, Salmon, appears in the Old Testament, in the book of Joshua, in the story of the battle of Jericho. Salmon was a spy in this battle, and he was given shelter by a harlot named Rahab, whom he later married. The name also appears in the New Testament, in the book of Matthew, in the long lineage of begats stretching from Abraham to Jesus.
Associate Professor / 
Psychology
Yale University
Dr. Laurie Santos is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Yale University. Her research provides an interface between evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, and cognitive neuroscience, exploring the evolutionary origins of the human mind by comparing the cognitive abilities of human and non-human primates. Her experiments focus on non-human primates (in captivity and in the field), incorporating methodologies from cognitive development, animal learning psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Since 1985, I have, with great pleasure, been in the Chapel Hill Philosophy Department, where I am the Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor and the Director of UNC's Program in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. I am also a Professorial Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh. During the 2015-16 academic year I will be visiting the Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Within philosophy, my interests include metaethics, moral theory, political philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics. Outside of philosophy, I spend a decent amount of time appreciating good coffee, indulging a taste for old cars and motorcycles, and for nine years, but sadly no longer, I spent time providing early morning child care at our kids' school, the Montessori Children's House of Durham, where my wife was, for eight years (all after my time there), the Head of School.
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Yale University
Kelley Schiffman received her PhD in philosophy from Yale University in 2015. Her work focuses on the intersection of early modern philosophy and ethics.
Assistant Professor  / 
Philosophy
Humboldt-University
Dr. Stephan Schmid teaches at the Humboldt-University in Berlin, Germany. In his research, he mainly focuses on philosophy of mind and metaphysics of Early Modern and Late Medieval Philosophy. He is also interested in contemporary metaphysics, particularly in questions of modality, causation, and explanation.
Research Fellow in Bioethics / 
Philosophy
National Institutes of Health
Jeff Sebo is currently a Research Fellow in Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. He was previously Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow in Animal and Environmental Studies at New York University, where he received his PhD in Philosophy in 2011.  His research focuses on agency and moral status in human and nonhuman animals, and his teaching focuses on bioethics, animal ethics, and environmental ethics with an emphasis on interdisciplinary and intersectional perspectives.
Professor / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is the Chauncey Stillman Professor in Practical Ethics in the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. He has served as the co-director of the MacArthur Law and Neuroscience Project and co-investigator at the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics. He has worked on ethics (theoretical, applied, and empirical), philosophy of law, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and informal logic. Sinnott-Armstrong is the author of Morality Without God? and Moral Skepticisms and editor of Moral Psychology, volumes I-III. His articles have appeared in a variety of philosophical, scientific, and popular journals and collections. He has received fellowships from the Harvard Program in Ethics and the Professions, the Princeton Center for Human Values, the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, the Center for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University, and the Sage Center for the...
Professor / 
Cognitive Science; School of Management
Yale University
I am from Baltimore, proud home of Edgar Allan Poe, H.L. Mencken, John Waters, and Henrietta Lacks. (To read more about how growing up in Baltimore affected my research trajectory, please see my dissertation acknowledgements.) I hold a B.A. from Brown University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. I conduct research on moral psychology, emotions, personal identity, humor, and aesthetics. At present, I am a Postdoctoral Associate at Duke University.

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A Toolkit for Building a Better Mind.