Contributors

Listed by last name.

A (3) | B (2) | C (3) | D (7) | E (1) | F (2) | G (5) | H (6) | J (2) | K (4) | L (2) | M (3) | N (3) | O (1) | P (1) | R (4) | S (9) | T (2) | W (5) | Y (1)
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Bryce is a graduate student in philosophy at Duke University. He's interested in the mind-body problem and related issues in philosophy.
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Colgate University
David Miguel Gray is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Colgate University. He is also an Affiliate of the Africana and Latin American Studies Program at Colgate University. His interests are in Philosophy of Psychology, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Race and Racism, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Science, and African-American Philosophy (In particular, the African-American intellectual tradition)
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Yale University
Daniel Greco teaches at the Department of Philosophy at Yale University. He works mainly on epistemology, but he is also interested in metaethics, philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind. 
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Caspar Hare is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at MIT.  He writes about ethics, practical rationality, metaphysics, and the connections between them. He knows a magic trick that Winston Churchill once insisted be performed half a dozen times (he was still baffled).
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Matthew C. Harris is a Philosophy PhD student at Duke University. His interests include philosophical psychology, personal identity and pragmatism.
Ford Professor of Philosophy and Women's & Gender Studies / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sally Haslanger is a Professor of Philosophy at MIT, and the Director of the MIT Women’s and Gender Studies program. Her philosophical interests are broad. She began her life in philosophy interested in metaphysics, epistemology and ancient philosophy; over time she has developed her interests in social and political philosophy and feminist theory. She has an adorable dog named ‘Sparky’.                       
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Paul Henne is a PhD student at Duke University. Before attending Duke, he received his MA from Arizona State University and his BA from Lake Forest College. His primary interests in philosophy are in metaphysics and empirical philosophy, and they are particularly about absences, omissions, and nothingness. He is, for instance, curious about the gap between our judgments about omissions and their relation to the world.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Cambridge
Richard Holton is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Camrbdige (previously at MIT). His dissertation was on philosophy of language, and he continues to work in that area, but he currently works mainly in moral psychology, ethics, and philosophy of law. If you need your bike fixed, Richard’s your man.
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Virginia
Paul Humphreys, Commonwealth Professor of Philosophy, specializes in the philosophy of science. He is co-director of UVA’s Center for the Study of Data and Knowledge; series editor of Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Science; a senior editor of  Oxford Research Reviews; a member of the editorial boards of Synthese, Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, and Foundations of Science; and a member of the governing board of the Philosophy Documentation Center. He is also editor of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Science.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Duke University
Andrew Janiak is Creed C. Black Associate Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Bass Society of Fellows at Duke University. Most recently, he’s the author of Newton (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015), and is currently writing the first English-language philosophical monograph on Émilie Du Châtelet with Professor Karen Detlefsen at Penn. He’s a co-leader of Project Vox.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
University of California, San Diego
Monte Ransome Johnson is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, San Diego. He received a Ph. D. in the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the University of Toronto in 2003, and was awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2006. He is the author of Aristotle on Teleology (Oxford University Press, 2005), ‘Authenticating Aristotle’s Protrepticus’ (with D. S. Hutchinson, in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 2005), and other essays on ancient philosophy, including contributions to The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius (2008) and The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (2014). 
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Justin is an assistant professor of philosophy at MIT. He did his graduate work in philosophy at Yale, after receiving his BA from UC-Davis. His research is focused primarily within philosophy of language and related issues in metaphysics.
Professor / 
Philosophy and Cognitive Science
Yale University
Joshua Knobe is an experimental philosopher, appointed in both the Program in Cognitive Science and the Department of Philosophy. Most of his work involves using the kinds of experimental methods associated with cognitive science to address the kinds of questions associated with philosophy.
Emeritus Professor / 
Philosophy
University of Toronto
Elmar Kremer is interested in 17th and 18th century philosophy and philosophy of religion.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow / 
Philosophy
University of Toronto
I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Philosophy department at the University of Toronto previously, I was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, working with Peter Railton.  I received a PhD in Philosophy in 2013 from the University of Arizona.  I am a member of the Moral Psychology Research Group and the Prospection Group. In 2010/11 I was a visiting fellow in the Harvard Philosophy Department and in Joshua Greene’s Moral Cognition Lab.  I work in ethics, moral psychology, and cognitive science. I also have interests in epistemology, philosophy of mind, and evolutionary theory. 
Professor / 
Philosophy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Marc Lange is Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His main research interests lie in the philosophy of science and related regions of metaphysics and epistemology. His degrees are from Princeton and Pittsburgh. His books include Natural Laws in Scientific Practice (Oxford, 2000), which concerns the role that laws of nature play in scientific thinking, and An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics: Locality, Fields, Energy, and Mass (Blackwell, 2002), which is intended to be an accessible introduction to various questions about the metaphysics of physics (especially questions arising in connection with classical electromagnetism).
Assistant Professor / 
Philosophy
Barnard-Columbia University
Karen Lewis teaches philosophy at Barnard-Columbia.  Previously, she was an assistant professor in the school of philosophy at USC. Her research is mainly in the philosophy of language, though it often brings me into the realms of metaphysics, epistemology, cognitive science, philosophy of mind, and linguistics.
Graduate Student / 
Philosophy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
I am a Ph.D student in the Department of Philosophy at UNC Chapel Hill. I am interested in normative ethics, with a special focus on Kantian ethics. I also dabble in Kant scholarship, with a particular focus on Kant's "Doctrine of Virtue" and the Lectures on Ethics.
Associate Professor / 
Philosophy
Cornell University
Julia Markovits teaches philosophy at Cornell. Before joining Cornell, she taught at MIT and was as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Her research focuses on ethics.  More specifically, on questions concerning the nature of moral reasons and about moral praiseworthiness and blameworthiness.
Professor / 
Philosophy
Pennsylvania State University
Eduardo Mendieta is professor of philosophy at Pennsylvania State University. Professor Mendieta works on critical philosophy of race, Latin American philosophy, the Frankfurt School, and issues relating to religion, globalization, global justice, and animality.

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